Monday Briefing | November 5

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A Yemeni child suffering from malnutrition lies on a bed at a treatment center in a hospital in the capital, Sanaa. Mohammed Huwais/Getty Images

Stories to Follow

Shooting in Florida Yoga Studio Kills 2, Injures 5: Just shy of a week after the tragic mass shooting in Pittsburg, another shooting has taken place; this time in Tallahassee, Florida. The victims, 61 year-old doctor Nancy Van Vessem and 21 year-old  Florida State University student Maura Binkley, were killed after the shooter entered the hot yoga studio, acting as a customer, and opened fire just minutes after the workout class began. When police responded around 5:30 PM on Nov. 2nd, the shooter, 40 year-old Scott Paul Beierle of Deltona, Florida, was found dead on the scene of a self-inflicted gun wound. No connection has been found between the shooter and victims.

The United States has called for a ceasefire in Yemen: For the first time since the conflict in Yemen began in 2015, the United States has taken a stance in calling for peace in one of the worst humanitarian crisis in modern history, according to the UN. The statistics of this crisis are staggering, yet remain invisible in eyes of the general public. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, building off the leverage after the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi last month, has publicly stated, “It is time to end this conflict, replace conflict with compromise, and allow the Yemeni people to heal through peace and reconstruction.”

Pakistani Supreme Court has overturned death sentence for charge of blasphemy: In a historical decision that has been met with an equal amount of celebration and opposition, the Pakistani Supreme Court has made the decision to release 47-year-old mother of five, Asia Bibi, from her death sentence over a case of blasphemy. Bibi, a Christian living in Pakistan, has become a symbol of hope for religious minorities living in the country. However, opposition led protests and government agreements have shown that this decision will not be received easily by Islamists parties in Pakistan.

Trump sends troops to the Mexican border in anticipation for the arriving caravan: President Trump has now sent 5,200 military troops U.S./Mexican border nearly a month ahead of the slowly arriving “caravan” of Latin American immigrants. The president, however, has vowed to send anywhere from 10,000 to 15,000 troops, potentially more soldiers than were sent in the Iraq war, to defend our borders from the asylum seekers  in which he has called, “invasion of our country.” This deployment is estimated to cost the U.S. $200 million by the end of 2018.

This Week in JPI

How Overturning a Christian Woman’s Death Sentence Brought Pakistan to a Standstill  
by Zuha Siddiqui

Zuha Siddiqui writes about the acquittal of Asia Bibi – a woman falsely accused of blasphemy – in a landmark verdict issued by Pakistan’s Supreme Court. This long-delayed, historic decision freed Bibi after spending nine years on death row. Despite Bibi’s acquittal by the highest court in Pakistan, Christians in the country fear for their lives more than ever before.

Happening This Week

Midterm Elections: Tuesday, November 6th

Do not forget to vote in the midterm elections this upcoming Tuesday. More information as to who is running in your district, and polling locations, click here.

The New York Comedy Festival 2018: Nov. 5- Nov. 11

Click here for more information regarding locations, times and tickets!

In Your Free Time

On Broadway: The Prom | “In the new musical comedy “The Prom,” a farcical quartet of self-centered theater stars who descend on a small town in Indiana are played by a farce-loving quartet of real theater stars who have been encouraged to portray their roles as heightened versions of their own personalities.” — Sopan Deb, New York Times

In your ear buds: Caliphate | “At the heart of Caliphate, the New York Times’ limited audio series on the Islamic State, is an ineffable horror. Such is the nature of terrorism: Beyond extreme violence, terrorism typically expresses itself by conjuring a shadow of fear that looms over millions of people.” — Nicholas Quah, The Vulture

On your plate: Flipsigi | “I wanted to create a fun joint that celebrates Filipino cuisine in a casual taqueria style setting, easily resonating with people of all ages, no matter what city or country they come from.” — Jordan Andino, Executive Chef
Location: 525 HUDSON ST (Between Charles St & W 10th)
Price: $

This week’s Monday Briefing is brought to you by Brittany Brown.

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