Monday Briefing | November 26

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Jamal Khashoggi in March/Wikimedia commons

Stories to Follow

President Trump dismisses CIA report on Khashoggi killing: After global outrage at the killing of Saudi American journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the CIA released a report that concludes that Saudi Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salma, ordered his murder. President Trump dismissed the report, saying the CIA did not find Prince Mohammed guilty.“No, no, they didn’t conclude,” Trump said to reporters in Florida over the Thanksgiving holiday. “I’m sorry. No, they didn’t conclude. They did not come to a conclusion. They have feelings certain ways. I have the report … they have not concluded, I don’t know if anyone’s going to be able to conclude the crown prince did it.” His comments raised questions for politicians and foreign policy experts alike who are increasingly concerned about the U.S.’s relationship with Saudi Arabia, and what Khashoggi’s killing means for the safety of journalists who speak out against governments that restrict free speech.

Christian missionary killed on indigenous island: Christian missionary and self-proclaimed adventurer John Allen Chau was reportedly killed by bow and arrow after venturing onto the forbidden North Sentinel Island in the Bay of Bengal. The Sentinelese people, an indigenous population that refuses any contact with external individuals, have been known to attack outsiders to protect their land and way of life. Authorities are struggling to determine how and if they should retrieve Chau’s body, reigniting conversations around interactions with indigenous people and the work of missionaries in remote areas.

More than 30 are dead after boat capsizes in Uganda: At least 30 people have died after a boat capsized in Lake Victoria in Uganda. The party boat—which had been in poor condition for some time and did not have a license to operate—overturned and sank on Saturday evening. According to the New York Times, officials expect the death toll to rise. Boat accidents in East African have become more common in recent years.

Roughly 85,000 Yemeni children may have died of starvation: In a new report, Save the Children estimates that roughly 85,000 children under the age of five have died of starvation since the bombings began in 2015. The organization believes this is likely an undercount, and many scholars believe that this is the worst humanitarian crisis in the world. Amid growing public pressure, the U.S. heads to Sweden this December to begin peace talks on ending the war in Yemen.

Happening This Week

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics: November 26th, 2018

Donna Brazile, Yolanda Caraway, Leah Daughtry, and Minyon Moore will share their experiences as black women working in American politics at NYU Skirball. Copies of their book will be available at the talk.

First Saturdays at the Brooklyn Museum: December 1, 2018

Museumgoers can enjoy free entry at First Saturdays at the Brooklyn Museum. December’s theme is “Best of the Borough” and will feature galleries, panels, a live music festival and more.

NY Indonesian Food Bazaar Christmas Edition: December 1, 2018

The Indonesian Food Bazar Christmas Edition will take place in Queens, NYC.

In Your Free Time

For the subway: The World as It Is: A Memoir of the Obama White House | In Ben Rhodes’ memoir of his time as foreign policy advisor, speechwriter, and deputy national security advisor for Barack Obama, the former fiction writer narrates a thrilling and complicated White House—from an optimistic nation hopeful for a unique future, to watching President Trump take over the White House after a grueling and surprising election. Featured in Obama’s 2018 summer reading list, Rhodes’ book is an insightful read for foreign policy wonks yearning for a look into working in the White House.

In your ears: The Brookings Cafeteria | The Brookings Cafeteria offered up 9 good policy ideas on Thanksgiving that are sure to be useful well beyond the holiday season. Listen to scholars, policymakers, and practitioners discuss innovative ways to make incremental, yet valuable, changes to American lives.

On your stove:Turkey Silog | Turkey Silog(Garlic Fried Rice) is a Filipino breakfast staple that gives you a chance to put that leftover turkey or ham to use. The New York Times Cooking version of the dish calls for turkey or ham, jasmine rice, leftover gravy, sunny side up eggs, and a few other inexpensive ingredients that will make your mornings a bit tastier.

This week’s Monday Briefing was brought to you by Kayla Stewart.

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