Monday Briefing | October 21

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Photo courtesy of the Wall Street Journal

Stories to Follow

Police Increase Security in Hong Kong: Protests in Hong Kong are still going strong despite police attempts to ban the marches. On Sunday, protestors took to the streets to hold an unauthorized rally in the wake of a ban on these demonstrations. These protests first began about four months ago when a bill was introduced that would give the Chinese government greater power over criminals in Hong Kong, which many feared would undermine Hong Kong’s autonomy and its residents’ civil liberties. That initial movement has spread since early June into demonstrations against alleged police misconduct and full democracy in the Chinese territory. This past weekend, tens of thousands of protesters flooded the streets despite authorities’ continued crackdown on these demonstrations. As restrictions have tightened, protests have turned increasingly violent. Protesters allegedly threw fire bombs at police, who in turn fired tear gas into the crowd and allegedly blasted a mosque with a water cannon. Thousands of people have suffered injuries from the unrest, but there still appears to be no end in sight.

California Schools Push Back Start Time: California Governor Gavin Newson is enacting statewide reform to give kids extra time to sleep, and it could have sweeping effects across the country. Signed into law last week, California middle schools are no longer allowed to start before 8 a.m., and high schools cannot start lessons before 8:30 a.m. While many pediatric officials across the country are applauding this measure because it will likely allow kids to get some extra shut-eye, some parents are not as thrilled because of the potential impacts on their work schedules. Amid research that supports medical advantages to starting school later, other school districts across the country are considering similar legislation. That means that California’s new law is under the microscope as others watch to see how it’s implemented and if the transition to later start times goes smoothly. The California law will be implemented over the course of the next three years, and some rural school districts are exempt.

Happening this Week

2019 Great PUPkin Dog Costume Contest, Fort Greene Park, October 26 2019

Leo Moreton / Flickr

Manhattan has plenty of Halloween activities to choose from, but Brooklyn’s got its fair share too. Come out to Fort Greene Park on Saturday, Oct. 26, to see which dog is rocking the best costume. Judging starts at 11:30 a.m., and hundreds of dogs are expected to strut the runway to wins the hearts of judges and spectators.

Panel Discussion: Female Diplomats and Diplomacy in a Changing World, 31 Washington Place, October 24 2019

Interested in hearing from women who work in diplomacy? Diplomats working in Israel, Singapore and Greece will speak at the Silver Center for Arts and Sciences on Thursday, Oct. 24. The panelists will discuss what it’s like to be a female diplomat, the role of social media, and will take time to answer questions from the audience. You can RSVP here.

In Your Free Time

WNYC’s Radiolab is taking a dive into Dolly Parton’s lyrics and legacy — and, as of October 15, the first episode is officially out on podcast streaming services. Radiolab’s creator and host Jab Abumrad spent the last two years following around the country music queen to learn more about her discography and relationship with the word “feminism.” If you’re a life-long Dolly fan or a casual listener, you can learn something new about her history and lyricism. You can listen to the first episode of the series here.

This week’s Monday Briefing was brought to you by Emmy Freedman.

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