Monday Briefing | February 15

Monday Briefing | February 15

March in support of Sen. Bernie Sanders in New York City, Jan. 30, 2016. Picture by Clare Church
March in support of Sen. Bernie Sanders in New York City, Jan. 30, 2016. Picture by Clare Church

Stories to Follow:

Cessation of Hostilities in Syria
On Friday, February 12, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced that world powers have agreed to a “cessation of hostilities” in Syria, according to Al Jazeera. The cessation will begin on officially February 19, seven days after Kerry’s initial announcement.
Along with the “cessation of hostilities,” world leaders have agreed to an immediate delivery of aid to Syria, according to CNN. Although the agreement is not to take effect until Friday, Reuters reports several countries are concerned with the continued Russian bombing in support of President Bashar al-Assad. The agreement hopes to initiate peace talks to put an end to the continued killing and displacement of millions in the Middle East.

Turning Points in Nevada and South Carolina
If the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary surprised or confused you, this upcoming week in presidential campaigns may offer some clarity. This Saturday, February 20, hosts both the Nevada Democratic Caucus and the South Carolina Republican Primary. The unpredictably close competition between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders may reach a turning point at the Nevada Democratic Caucus. Rebecca Lambe states to the New York Times that Nevada will “either be a potential firewall or a potential tiebreaker.” Meanwhile, the South Carolina Republican Primary may determine which Republican candidates choose to end or prolong their campaign. According to the Washington Post however, Donald Trump has topped 19 of the last 20 polls in South Carolina, making the primary “Trump’s to lose.”

Annual Women’s Memorial March
For some, February 14th signifies a day of eating chocolates, holding hands and taking romantic walks in Central Park. The Women’s Memorial March Committee walks for another purpose; to spread awareness and compassion for the murdered and missing indigenous women across North America.
Native American women face violence on an unprecedented level. According to the U.S. Justice Department, Native American women are 2.5 times more likely to experience sexual assault compared to all other races. The Supreme Court is currently hearing arguments regarding the Dollar General Corporation v. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians case, which follows the story of a thirteen-year old youth who was allegedly sexually molested by a Dollar General Manager on Choctaw tribal lands. The Dollar General Manager claims that the native tribal courts cannot press charges against him, because the crime was committed on native land. The outcome of the case will set a precedent regarding the civil jurisdiction over non-natives who commit crimes on native lands.

Happening This Week
Displacement, Response, and Durable Solutions: How Can the International Humanitarian Community Address the Refugee Crisis?
Tuesday, February 16th from 12:30pm-1:30pm | The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 295 Lafayette Street, 2nd Floor
Guest speaker Fiston Kahindo from the International Rescue Committee speaks to the challenges of the Refugee Crisis while offering possible policy recommendations. Kahindo will make reference to Kenya’s experiences with refugees from Somalia and South Sudan.

JPI Happy Hour
Thursday, February 18th at 6:30pm | West 3rd Commons
Come to the JPI Happy Hour to celebrate the start of new semester. Meet the editorial board, learn about opportunities to write for the journal and enjoy a drink on us!

New York Fashion Week
Wednesday, February 10th – Thursday, February 18th
If you’re wondering why women are still wearing heels while bracing the cold weather, New York Fashion Week may be the best possible explanation. International fashion designers are in New York this week to show off their best work.

The Digital Divide: EU v. US over Data Protection
Monday, February 22 from 12:30pm-2:00pm | Conference Room 1501, International Affairs Building, Columbia University
Max Schrems, founder of Europe v. Facebook, leads a discussion raising important issues regarding the contrasts between American and European internet regulation and privacy rights. Guest speakers include Anya Schiffrin, Adam Tooze, Julia Angwin and Peter Micek.

In Your Free Time:
Prepare for the 88th Annual Oscars being held on Sunday, February 28th by watching some of the films nominated for Best Documentary. Cartel Land, The Look of Silence and Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom are outstanding cinematic pieces, offering provocative commentary on modern world issues.

Jane Mayer’s “Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right” continues to receive rave reviews since its release in late January. The book uses the Koch brothers as a launching point for a discussion on economic inequality and “dark money” in the United States.

This week’s Monday Briefing was brought to you by Clare Church

 

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